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Department 

of 

Aviation 




■ASPORTATION l\H«m 

APR 1987 
NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSIK 



City 

o 

Chicago 



agmmg. m@m 




CITY OF CHICAGO 




**** 




CITY OF CHICAGO 




^ ^ ^ -^ 



DEPARTMENT OF AVIATION 
CITY OF CHICAGO 



ME 

9797 7^4 

US 32l «f 

WILLIAM E. DOWNES, JR., Commissioner 
J. P. DUNNE, Deputy Commissioner 




CITY OF CHICAGO 




JOHN A. CASEY General Manager of Operations 

FERDINAND F. ROSA Administrative Engineer 

HERBERT H. HOWELL Chief of Planning 

RAY C. BROWNELL Assistant Chief of Planning 

JOHN F. O'CONNOR Chief of Finance 

KENNETH W. COURSE Administrative Assistant 

MICHAEL J. BERRY Manager, Chicago Midway Airport 

JOHN L. CARR Ass'f. Mgr., Chicago-O'Hare International Airport 

THOMAS J. CUSACK Asst. Mgr., Merrill C. Meigs Field 



■^ 3? ^r". ^n 





Gnicdmt '/J. cJja/^> 



Mayor 



JOHN C. MARCIN 

City Clerk 



M. A. GORDON 

Deputy City Clerk 



Ward ALDERMAN 

1. DONALD W. PARILLO 

2. WILLIAM H. HARVEY 

3. RALPH H. METCALFE 

4. CLAUDE W. B. HOLMAN 

5. LEON M. DESPRES 

6. A. A. RAYNER, JR. 

7. NICHOLAS J. BOHLING 

8. WILLIAM COUSINS, JR. 

9. DOMINIC J. LUPO 

10. JOHN J. BUCHANAN 

11. MATTHEW J. DANAHER 

12. DONALD T. SWINARSKI 

13. CASIMIR J. STASZCUK 

14. JOSEPH P. BURKE 

15. JOSEPH J. KRSKA 

16. PAUL M. SHERIDAN 

17. WILLIAM H. SHANNON 

18. EDWARD J. HINES 

19. THOMAS F. FITZPATRICK 

20. KENNETH E. CAMPBELL 

21. WILSON FROST 

22. OTTO F. JANOUSEK 

23. FRANK J. KUTA 

24. GEORGE W. COLLINS 

25. VITO MARZULLO 

26. STANLEY M. ZYDLO 

27. HARRY L. SAIN 

28. JOSEPH JAMBRONE 

29. ROBERT BIGGS 

30. EDWIN H. McMAHON 

31. THOMAS E. KEANE 

32. ROBERT J. SULSKI 

33. ROBERT BRANDT 

34. REX SANDE 

35. CASIMIR C. LASKOWSKI 

36. JOHN F. AIELLO 

37. THOMAS J. CASEY 

38. WILLIAM J. CULLERTON 

39. ANTHONY C. LAURINO 

40. SEYMOUR SIMON 

41. EDWARD T. SCHOLL 

42. MAYER GOLDBERG 

43. G. BARR McCUTCHEON 

44. THOMAS ROSENBERG 

45. EDWIN P. FIFIELSKI 

46. JOSEPH R. KERWIN 

47. JOHN J. HOELLEN 

48. ROBERT J. O'ROURKE 

49. PAUL T. WIGODA 

50. JACK I. SPERLING 
ROBERT F. CAMPBELL 

Record Clerk 



cty of cmc^o DEPARTMENT OF AVIATION 

fSff-^1 Room 1000, City Hall . Chicago 2, Illinois 



RICHARD J. DALEY 



To His Honor the Mayor 

and Gentlemen of the City Council 

The Department of Aviation submits herewith 
its Annual Report for the year ended December 31, 
1967. 

It is my pleasure to report that our Airports 
have once again, as in previous years, achieved 
new records in both aircraft operations, number of 
passengers and cargo tonnage. Throughout the year 
we have met the challenge of the industry with con- 
struction of new facilities and expansion of existing 
facilities to maintain pace with one of the fastest 
growing industries to-day. 

The Department gratefully acknowledges your 
cooperation and assistance in making its achieve- 
ments possible. We are also appreciative of the 
splendid relationship it has enjoyed with other gov- 
ernmental, civic and industrial groups. 



«t E. DOWNES, j 



Respectfully yours, V j 





l/U illlant O . <== UJowite^ It. 



Commissioner of Aviation 



The Department of Aviation was created 
under Section 8.2-1 of the Municipal Code 
of Chicago. This provision states, in part, 
that the Commissioner of Aviation shall: 



"Hove the management and control of 
the design, operation and maintenance 
of all public airports owned and oper- 
ated by the City.' 1 



The 1967 Annual Report is submitted in 
compliance with Section 8.2-4 and Section 
25-23' of the Municipal Code which re- 
quires all departments of the City of Chi- 
cago to submit an Annual Report on their 
official activities. 



<=/J&d teat '-</(y/t/ 



c„ 



ity is only as great as t, 



he faci/it 



nJ 



ities and services it 



3 

provides for its people, as we/l as for (nose who visit it. 

cJhrough the years, Chicago has met the challenge - in 
building a great school system, a great parks system, a great 
water ana sewer system, a great expressway system, a great 



airport system, and a great mass rapid transportation 
system. 

/low. with the dedication of the new Chicago lltidway 
^Airport, the challenge of the jet air age is being met. 

Chicagoans recognized (he air age in igi6. when they 
dedicated the original Chicago 1 1 lunicipal J/Lirport, on a 
small area within this same site, and which has grown to 
its present mile-square complex. 

we now re-dedicate Chicago lltidway J/iuport as a 
modernized facility to accommodate the sleek aircraft which 
will he using it. 

vUe have rebuilt lltidway because of our desire to help 
keep Chicago one of the truly great progressive cities of 
the nation. 

cJo the people of Chicago and our visitors from all over 
the nation, this monument of progress, Chicago lltidway 
j\irport, is dedicated. 

(Richard §. 0)a/ey 
lltayor 



Welc back to - MIDWAY 



I 



s-true, Midway is back. Within a fevx 
airports in the United States. 



years, it should be one of the busiest 



Built in 1926 as the first major aviation facility in Chicago, Midway became 
the nation's busiest airport only to lose all of its airline traffic to newer and larger 
Chicago-O'Hare. Now congestion at O'Hare has caused major airlines to take 
another look at Midway, sitting almost unused with the exception of general avia- 
tion traffic. By early 1968, most airlines serving O'Hare also will have returned 
schedules to Midway. 



To prepare for this influx of new traffic, Midv 
rehabilitation including resurfacing of its two majo 
new terminal facilities. 



is undergoing a complete 
lways and construction of 



With these new and improved facilities, there is every indication that Midway 
by 1970 will be one of the principal air carrier airports in the nation. A :cording to 
estimates, by 1970 Midway traffic will match the peak passenger volumes achieved 
during its heyday 10 years ago. 

Midway is still small by today's standards. It covers only a square mile as 
compared to present day metropolitan airports which cover many square miles. 
When resurfaced Midway's two major runways will be only 6,520 ft. and 6,104 ft. 
long, not enough to handle the big transcontinental or intercontinental jets, but still 
sufficient to land two and three-engine jets including the stretched 727-200. When 
it goes bacK into use, Chicago Midway will become, in essence, Chicago's down- 
town airport. Servicing the DC-9, 727 and 737, the BAC 111 and Caravelle 
types, it will handle the local movements in and out of Chicago on stage distances 
up to about 1,000 miles. 

Expansion back into Midway actually is a stopgap for rapidly increasing air 




Artist's rendering of Chicago Midway Airport looking west 




Air view of Midway Airport 



traffic until a third major Chicago airport can be completed in the 1970's. 

Midway was Chicago's only airport serving major air carriers until 1955 when 
O'Hare was commissioned. Not much traffic went to O'Hare initially, but with the 
development and use of the four-engine jets, the much longer runways at O'Hare 
were necessary. New terminal facilities were opened at O'Hare early in 1962 and 
airlines began shifting from Midway to O'Hare. By July 1962, all airline flights had 
been moved and Midway was deserted. 

The exodus from Midway proved a boon for general aviation. With no airline 
traffic, private planes were welcomed back and a landing fee was eliminated. Now 
with airlines taking over again, a landing fee for general aviation planes is to be 
imposed probably at the rate of $.30 per 1,000 lbs. with a $2.50 minimum. 

With the tremendous growth in airline passenger traffic, O'Hare in 1962 had 
topped all previous passenger records at Midway and by 1967 had reached more 
than 27.5 million passengers for the year. It was to get away from this congestion 
that the airlines began thinking of Midway again. United was the first back in 
operation, returning with 10 flights a day on July 5, 1964. United suspended flights 
during the rehabilitation work on Midway but was to be the first back in operation 
again after the work was completed. 



According to plans, all major airlines operating in and out of O'Hare were 
to move portions of schedules to Midway with the exception of Continental. Author- 
ization of Continental in and out of Chicago does not provide for short stage length 
flights, although Continental has said that if CAB authorization is granted, they 
also will schedule flights into Midway. 








Inferior View of Lobby 




Work at Midway is costing about $10 million and is being paid for 
primarily by the City of Chicago and the airlines, with additional State 
and Federal-Aid. When it gets back into operation, Midway expects to 
be on a - paying basis, both on capital invested and operating expenses. 

When Midway was operating at full capacity, it had 4 sets of dual 
runways. Only two of these runways are being resurfaced. They are 
13R-31L, which is 6,520 ft. long, and 22L-4R, which is 6,104 ft. The 
center 100 ft. of the runway is receiving concrete pavement with the 
balance of the 175 ft. width covered with bituminous surfacing. Most of 
the other runways will be used as taxiways. 

The new terminal will be located at the northeast corner and along 
the eastern edge of the field. It will be on the site of the old terminal 
but will be much larger. Configuration of the new terminal was adopted 
because it gives space for 28 gates, each capable of handling a Boeing 
727, the largest passenger plane expected to use the field. In addition, 
there well be terminal space for a helicopter use. 

There will be three concourses, each 20 ft. wide. Three ticket selling 
areas are planned and each concourse will have its own baggage claim 
area. Each gate has a 50 ft. x 25 ft. departure lounge with a new general 
lobby. Entrance will be from approximately the same location as the 
older terminal. 

According to a pattern which is being established by movement of 
schedules back to Midway, Chicago aviation planning officials believe 
airline operations on the field will be up to 10,000 by mid-1968. By 
the end of 1968, this should be up to 35,000 and early in the 70's, 
will hit 180,000, the limit for the new terminal. This will be a little more 
than 6,000 operations a year per gate, close to what O'Hare has been 
doing with its 70 domestic gates. 

With efficient passenger scheduling by the airlines, we do not be- 
lieve there will be a need for much transferring of passengers from 
Midway to O'Hare. O'Hare will be for the long haul passengers. Midway 
for the short haul. However, helicopter service to serve transfers between 
O'Hare and Midway is scheduled to go back into operation once the 
move to Midway is completed. 

No one in Chicago believes a revitalized Midway is the answer to 
all of the City's aviation problems. It is a good temporary answer, but 
according to present forecasts, both fields will be operating to capacity 
early in the 70's. 

Chicago needs a new metropolitan airport and, if it is to retain 
its position as one of the leading transportation centers in the world, 
it must have one by 1975. 



Exterior View of Terminal Building and Tower 



UNDER 
CONSTRUCTION 

SEPTEMBER- 1967 




S3 






HBW W 







Wfcr^^E^ 



Before 



V 



snaniM in 



.mil. r *tj 




CONSTRUCTION 
COMPLETED 



DECEMBER 196 7 



After 



TRAFFIC AT 
CHICAGO MIDWAY AIRPORT 



1962 


107,778 










1963 


126.959 










1964 


217.037 


AIRCRAFT 
OPERATIONS 








1965 


216,043 










1966 


258,491 






1967 


261,068 










1962 


35.05 








1963 


NONE 




1964 


3.21 


FREIGHT EXPRESS 






AND MAIL 


1965 


2.49 


(in 000.000 lbs) 








1966 


.975 | 




1967 


■366| 










1962 


659,550 








\ 


1963 


417,544 










1964 


823,676 


PASSENGERS 






1965 


882,349 






1966 


1,094,878 






1967 


1,077,666 









Midway Airport, in 1967, accommodated 261,068 operations, which ranks 
it the sixty-second busiest airport in the United States. Much of this was local flying, 
however, which we do not contemplate continuing once scheduled air carriers re- 
turn. Midway Airport was without scheduled service, the airlines transferring all 
schedules to O'Hare Field shortly after the new terminal facilities were opened in 
1962. United Air Lines resumed scheduled service December 15, 1967, and other 
airlines will follow in 1968. The number of passengers showed a slight decrease, 
which was due to the field's being closed from August to December for reconstruction. 



CHICAGO-O'HARE INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT 

Except for one single year, since World War II, Chicago has maintained the 
world's busiest airport. Midway Airport was the busiest through 1960. 

Prior to World War II, it was recognized that Midway would not be able to 
handle all of Chicago's airport problems. After the War, traffic considerations as 
well as other factors dictated that a new airport be located northwest of Chicago. 

The first unit of the Terminal Building had been completed by 1955, along 
with runway extensions, taxiways, and an additional runway. However, traffic re- 
mained light until the advent of the civil jet transport aircraft in 1959. This big 
technological surprise was an unprecedented success, due to public acceptance and 
the utility of the jet transport. This resulted in the inauguration of the first jet service 
at O'Hare in 1959. 

Every year since 1959 has seen a steady growth in traffic at O'Hare, so that 
in 1967, FAA Tower reported 643,787 aircraft operations. There were 27,552,816 
passengers. Under these circumstances the capacity of the airport and its facilities 




Artist's rendering of the proposed expansion of O'Hare Field 



are taxed to the utmost. Therefore in 1967, a three step program was put in progress 
to alleviate the crowding at O'Hare Field. This is in accordance with a pattern to 
provide Chicago with airport facilities to accommodate the present traffic, and that 
expected in the foreseeable future. 

The first step of the program has been underway since August 1967. This is 
the reactivation of Midway Airport, involving an expenditure of more than ten mil- 
lion dollars in City funds, State funds, Federal-Aid Airport funds, as well as funds 
furnished by the scheduled airlines. 

We are in a period of rapid and sustained growth in airline operations and 
increase in passengers. With the expected advent of the jumbo-jets in 1970, fol- 
lowed by the supersonic aircraft planned for scheduled service in the mid 70's, 
there will be an unusual acceleration in all aviation activities. 



The second phase involves the expansion of the terminal facilities at O'Hare . 
Field. The aim here is to provide adequate accommodations for a greater number 
of aircraft. Our Architects and Engineers with the assistance of our Airport Con- 
sultant have prepared a comprehensive report for the proposed expansion of O'Hare 
Field at a cost of 280 million dollars. This proposal was submitted to the airlines 
for consideration and approval. 

The immediate improvements to commence in early 1968 are as follows: 

Reconstruction of the 11,600 foot runway NW-SE. 

One additional NE-SW runway. 

Multi-level parking structure — 12,000 car capacity. 

Expansion of Heating and Refrigeration Plant. 

Expansion of Terminal Buildings to provide additional gate positions. 

New improved Air Cargo Area consisting of 280 acres. 

Neither the reactivation of Midway nor the expansion of O'Hare is the com- 
plete answer to all of the City's aviation problems. 

Chicago needs another metropolitan airport. If it is to retain its position as 
the leading transportation center in the world, it must build a third major airport. 



illllllllllllllllllllllll PROPOSED 

REHABI LI TATION 
■■ NEW CONSTRUCTION 

O'HARE FIELD 




LI aoO' 



Air Cargo Plans For Tomorrow 

Although there are many conflicting opinions as to the ultimate growth of the 
air freight business, in 1967 plans went ahead with an optimism, which indicates that 
a bright future is assured. Overall air cargo business in the nation showed a gain of 
20% in revenue. 

Continental's huge air cargo building at O'Hare, rapidly nearing completion, is 
indicative of the expanded growth of cargo traffic visualized by far-seeing officials 
of large companies. Chicago, ranking first in the nation in air cargo volume, is aware 
that to stay out in front it is necessary to adopt more efficient ground facilities. This is 
true of all airlines and their terminals. 

There is considerable discussion of higher air freight rates, as compared to 
trucking and railroad costs. This is not always too realistic, as certain shippers will 
tend to use air freight because of the nature of their business. For instance, air ship- 
pers desiring to eliminate costly warehousing on a large scale can always be sold air 
service. 

An interesting example is the transportation of computers. No firm can afford to 
have the sensitivity of these highly complex instruments damaged by jolting over the 
roads, which can certainly happen with truck movements. Where computers are leased, 
there is the added profit motive to consider. Rental income starts immediately with fast 
service delivery of these computers. 

All major airlines are interested in Boeing's 747 cargo jet. It is estimated that these 
$22 million dollar planes will be in service in about two years. These large jets can 
take highway-sized trailers, using straight-in nose loading and unloading. Trucks will 
pick up the containers right at the plane, by-passing terminals. According to TWA, 
which has on order 1 2 of the big cargo jets, this birdy-back operation can reduce 
freight rates as much as 25%. 

O'Hare is forging ahead in the building of ground facilities to take care of ever- 
increasing air cargo. Expansion and improvements must go on in this area year after 
year, and this applies to foreign as well as domestic cargo freight. 

Specialists claim that the growth will be rapid, and will materialize as carriers 
inform more customers of the greater efficiency and increased profits, which are 
possible by using air cargo. 



-ip u i ■■■ ■■ 



hm,., 



Continental's new Cargo Building, nearing completic 




THE INVISIBLE SHIELD 

A Braniff International Hostess finds 
that her clear plastic "Space Bubble" not 
only protects her hair from wind and rain, 
but from others taking advantage of the 
tradition of the mistletoe. Braniff flies 
some 200,000 pounds, or 100 tons of 
Texas mistletoe, each Christmas. 



TRAFFIC AT 
CHICAGO-O'HARE INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT 



O'Hare Field is the City's major airport, 
handling virtually all of Chicago's sched- 



1962 
1963 
1964 
1965 
1966 
1967 

1962 
1963 
1964 
1965 
1966 
1967 

1962 
1963 
1964 
1965 
1966 
1967 

1962 
1963 
1964 
1965 
1966 
1967 

1962 
1963 
1964 
1965 
1966 
1967 



8,023 | 


INTERNATIONAL 
OPERATIONS 




uled air carrier operations. In 1967 there 






9,153 ! 


were 643,787 aircraft landings and take- 




offs, continuing its record as the world's 
busiest airport, with more than 27,500,000 


10,273 




11,035 | 


passengers. The airport is operating some- 






12,055 


what in excess of its feasible capacity, 




which results in some delays during peak 


16,548 


periods. 






AIRCRAFT 
OPERATIONS 

J 






(416,991 | 








426,098 | 








458,460 | 








509,621 








543,500 


Zl 










643,787 


1 














NATIONAL 

ENGERS 




380,781 








496,841 








627,333 


1 PASS 










670,468 


Z3 










761.728 


m 








S 


925,352 


! 














FREIGHT 

AND 

(in 00C 




442 








543 


J 


EXPRESS 






MAIL 


699.7 


ZJ 


,000 lbs.) 








887.6 


Z] 










1046.2 


~j 










1188.8 




1 




















13,525,955 


~i 










16,163,414 


HI 








PASSENGERS 


18,394,126 




1 












20,998,325 1 




23,589,683 




27,552,816 | 



CHICAGO 





[gEJ [nE3 



| Snack Ba,j Sod, Ft- | D, 



TrCKET COUNTERS 



TICKET COUNTERS 



@ ■ DOWN 



UPPER LEVEL 



BAGGAGE CLAIM 



LIMOUSINES 



LOWER LEVEL 



N z; 


A^ 




n n 


j 1 


1-1 


jj TICKET COUNTERS 


downB 


® ■ 




UPP 








BAGGAGE CLAIM 


■ 


CAR RENT 

o o 


o 


■ 




w. 




TAXICABS 

LOWE 





1967 I 27,552,816 



INTERNATIONAL 
AIRPORT 




©■ 



o o o 



HISTORY OF O'HARE 



n E. Downes is Chic, 



>. (Pat) Dunne, deputy 



fc^ 



l/M 








AAL-Americon Airlines 




I BNF-Braniff International Airways 




CO--Continenlal Airlines 




| Dl-Delta Airlines 




I EAL-Eastern Airlines 




LCA— Lake Central Airlines 




^ NO— North Central Airlines 




\ NWA— Northwest Airlines 




s y OZ— Ozork Airlines 




A AC-A: r Canada 




I TWA-Trons World Airways 




H UAL— United Air Lines 




AF— Air France 




AZ— Alitalia Airlines 




80AC— British Overseas Airway Corp. 




CMA-- Mexicana Airlines 




IN — Irish International Airlines 




PAA— Pan American Airways 




SWR— Swissair 




SAS— Scandinavian Airlines System 




DLH— Lufthansa German Airlines 




CR— Commuter 




"^ : -— — ' — * 



RESTROOMS ESCALATORS 



8. WESTERN UNION 



1 LOST &ND FOJNrJ] 
ine Also Has Its Own Lo s 



INTERNATIONAL 




CONCOURSE A 



TICKET COUNTER 




Merrill C. Meigs Field continued to show an increase in aircraft operations in 
1967. There were 76,267 operations compared to 72,906 in 1966. The number of 
passengers showed a slight decrease with 191,175 compared to 192,194 in 1966. 
This may have resulted because of the "Big Snow of 1967," and the McCormick 
Place fire which normally brings in many general aviation planes and people during 
the year. 

During 1967, four third level airlines with regular scheduled operations were 
added. This brings the total to five third level airlines now operating out of Meigs 
Field. 

The total scheduled operations at Meigs for 1967 were 8,777. 



TRAFFIC AT 
MERRILL C. MEIGS FIELD 



1962 


74,235 | 










1963 


75,860 | 










1964 


71,942 


AIRCRAFT 
OPERATIONS 








1965 


65,320 j 










1966 


72,906 | 










1967 


76,267 | 














1962 


281.004 






1963 


286,911 






1964 


201,586 








1965 


165,227 j 










1966 


192,194 










1967 


191,175 | 





Meigs Field continues to serve the flying businessman and, in addition, is the 
base for an ever-increasing volume of third level carriers. These are scheduled 
carriers which provide service to such nearby cities as Madison, Wisconsin, Ames, 
Iowa, Detroit, Michigan and St. Louis, Missouri, in small twin-engine aircraft, using 
close-in airports at the destination points, as well as in Chicago. Meigs handled 
76,267 operations and 191,175 passengers in 1967. Its rank in order of total air- 
craft operations was 223rd busiest airport in 1966, and in 1967 its rank was 160th 
busiest airport in the nation. 




First Aid Activities 

The passenger who finds it necessary to make 
transcontinental jet flights, and who has been con- 
fined to a wheel chair since childhood, sums up one 
of the realistic benefits of First Aid Stations at 
O'Hare when he says: " I do not look forward to the 
crowds, the waiting, nor the search for facilities 
I need. Your very competent nurse made every- 
thing pleasant for me. I had the use of a cot for 
a short nap. I look back on my stay at O'Hare 
with pleasure and happiness." 

O'Hare Field has two First Aid Stations. One in 
Terminal Building No. 1, and another in Terminal 
Building No. 2. These two stations are open seven 
days a week. A consulting physician and nine 
registered nurses are on the staff. The case load 
increases steadily each year. Wheel chairs are 
available at all times for any passenger who may 
need one. 

An air sick passenger writes: "I was so terribly 
air sick that I had to be wheeled into your First 
Aid center for treatment. Thank you so very much 
for the kind and courteous treatment extended 
to me." 

Another passenger says: "For the past eight 
years I have been carrying on a full time job after 
a couple of severe heart attacks. If at any time I 
am in Chicago and have an hour or so to wait I 
go to your First Aid Station. The attendant gives 
me a cot so that I can lie down each time. I have 
done this about eight times. I do not know of 
any other airport in the country that has these 
same facilities." 

First Aid is given credit again when the husband 
of a passenger writes: "I am sure, that if it were 
not for your very fine facilities, my wife would 
have reached the Mayo Clinic in a much sicker 
state than when we left Pensacola. I want to ex- 
press my gratitude to you and your fine city for 
the excellent medical facilities that are provided 
the traveler at your airport." 

If necessary, immediate emergency treatment in 
a nearby hospital is available in minutes. The pas- 
senger who may need oxygen does not have to 
go any farther than the First Aid Station. 

During 1967 there has been an increased op- 
portunity to render First Aid services to a greater 
number of persons at this airport. The case load 
increased 35 per cent from 6,367 in 1966 to 8,590 
in 1967. Served were 5,242 passengers, 408 visi- 
tors and 2,588 employees. 

There were 241 persons sent to hospitals, 178 
to nearby clinics, 170 referred to their family 
physicians, and oxygen was administered 53 times. 



New Equipment 



The twin-jet 737 short- 
haul transport, designed for 
100 to 1,300 mile routes, 
will enter schedule service 
in 1968. The 737 is the big- 
gest thing in little jets and 
will provide more jet service 
to more cities. 




When the first of the new 727-200s enters service in 1968, it will serve high- 
density, short-to-medium range commuter markets . . . and to meet future demands 
of rapidly expanding traffic. 

Only 20 feet longer than the highly profitable standard 727, the new -200 
can carry more passengers, at a lower seat-mile cost. With 34-inch spacing and 
6-abreast seating the 727-200 can carry 163 passengers. 

The 727-200 has the unique advantage of enough seating capacity to absorb 
peak-hour loads, eliminating the need for costly extra sections, gate positions, man- 
power and added airport congestion. 

The 727-200 can operate from the same shorter-runway airports used by the 
smaller 727-100. 





The Blizzard of 1961 

The airports in Chicago were particularly 
hard hit by the great blizzard, which started 
just before the morning rush hour on January 
26, 1967. It started with practically no warn- 
ing, and by the following day, when the 
storm ended, the depth of the snow was more 
than 23 inches. 

To form some idea of the incredible con- 
ditions which existed, we must take into ac- 
count that winds were from 23 to 38 knots 
an hour, with gusts up to 47 miles an hour. 

Snow removal operations were immediately 
put into effect, but with the heavy gusts of 
wind and continuing snow, no sooner had the 
men cleared the runways and other areas 
necessary for operation, than the drifts piled 
up again. The removal after each new snow- 
fall became an almost herculean task around 
the clock. Not only regular airport equipment 
was necessary, but other leased equipment. 
As visibility was cut and the snow drifted ovei 
the runways, the digging out process began al 
over again. 

During the storm period, parking lots at 
O'Hare were paralyzed with thousands of 
automobiles trapped in the deep snow. Where 
fuel was in short supply at O'Hare, gasoline 
was often transferred from trucks stuck in I 
snow. Huge mounds of snow formed by the 
devastatingly high winds had to be removed 
almost continuously in the runway and ramp 
areas. Their strength taxed to capacity, I 
dedicated crews worked on. 

The snow removal programs went on at all 
airports; around 45 inches practically crip 
pled Chicago from January 26 to mid-Febn 
ary. Snow had to be cleared from the airport 
and disposed. 

For periods of time during the emergency 
passengers waited to travel, and planes were 
snowed in waiting to move again, all Chica 
airports were closed. Sometimes emergency 
trucks were stalled, and only the tops of cars 
' were visible. In many cases, trucks could not 
move on service roads, cargo areas, and post 
office divisions. Eventually passengers went on 
their way, and the airport operations were 
resumed. 

It is gratifying to note that during this 
great storm, work crews, personnel and man- 
agement officials, maintained a consistent 
attitude of helpfulness and efficiency at the 
airports. In the face of this disaster such c 
attitude proved a decisive factor in gettir 
everything moving faster than seemed po 
sible. 



* 


kfti|L '"CUB A. 





Lost and Found 

Money, credentials, business contracts, mementos, 
these run the full gamut of all kinds of valuables, 
which passengers leave behind them at airports, and 
O'Hare is no exception. Special employees are al- 
ways on guard to determine that anything left be- 
hind will be returned to the rightful owners. There 
is a main "lost and found" department on the mez- 
zanine above the Continental ticket counters, and 
each airline also has its own "lost and found" near 
its baggage claim area. If a passenger discerns that 
something is missing before he leaves the airport, 
there is always a helpful employee on hand to search 
if there is time, and if not, to take down complete 
descriptions of any missing articles. 

Passengers are often so grateful that they enclose 
postage for returned items, not quite realizing that 
this is all part of the airport service. 

A business executive received this letter from the 
Department of Aviation when he sent a thank you 
and a check for mailing his portfolio. "Dear Sir: 
Enclosed you will find check made out to the un- 
dersigned which I am returning herewith. This is 
completely unnecessary, as we are happy to be of 
service." 

The head of a textile firm writes that a book con- 
taining a list of customers was so important "that 
without it we would have had difficulty in conduct- 
ing our business." 

There seems to be everything from blueprints for 
a new high rise to a baby's locket, and what makes 
it so surprising is that so many of these things which 
mean so much find their way back to the owners 
through kindness of people helped along by the effi- 
cient, alert personnel at Chicago-O'Hare Interna- 
tional Airport. 



Travelers Aid 

Probably the most unusual Travelers Aid service 
anywhere is in constant operation at O'Hare Air- 
port. The agency operates from an attractive en- 
closed office area on the "G" concourse, between 
Gates G-l and G-3. Since 1960 when the service 
was started it has consistently added caseworkers 
and volunteers who are able to handle practically 
any kind of emergency service you can name. 

The demand for the service increases steadily 
each year. As passenger service grows so has the 
demand for every kind of service. The case load 
has increased from 653 closed cases in 1961 to 
1,795 cases in 1967. As it expands it has also 
included medical and psychiatric placement, the 
location of relatives, as well as the temporary 
care of children coming in from the Orient, who 
often must have foster care until adoptive parents 
arrive. 

There is an around the clock answering service 
for late evenings, early mornings and Sundays. 
The Travelers Aid Globe is an important landmark 




Commissioner William E. Downes, welcomed the 
100 millionth passenger on arrival at O'Hare Field 
on May 15, 1967. 



New Look in Airline Fashions 

Top flight designers and airline executives have been in a huddle for some time over giving an entirely 
new image by creating new costumes for air stewardesses. As more attention is being given to other services, 
including more imaginative menus, these innovations will be welcomed. 

Eastern Airlines brings the entire fashion picture into sharp focus with the observation that "their new 
design gets away from the uniform appearance, but is appropriate to the attendants' work in the aircraft." 

Styles run the gamut from fashion culottes, A-line smocks and others. TWA's foreign accent themes stand 
out . . . the French minidress, Italian toga, and the long black hostess pajamas. Each airline has distinct cos- 
tumes for in-flight and street wear. 

American Airlines features a year-round American Blue coat in flyaway style with standup collar, white 
lining. This airline was the first to eliminate the regular stewardess hat, and the girls will wear a red, white 
and blue bow, and carry a scarf for windy days. Knee-high boots are of white corfam. 

A. BRANIFF INTERNATIONAL — B. UNITED — C. TWA — D. AMERICAN — E. CONTINENTAL — F. DELTA 
— G. NORTH CENTRAL — H. EASTERN — J. LAKE CENTRAL — K. NORTHWEST — L. OZARK. 

















History of O'Hare 

Chicago - O'Hare International 
Airport was renamed on June 28, 
1949 in honor of the late Navy 
ace Comdr. Edward H. O'Hare. 
Under the alert leadership of 
Mayor Richard J. Daley, the air- 
lines expanded their facilities to 
usher in the jet age at O'Hare in 
the spring of 1959. O'Hare be- 
came the world's busiest airport 
in 1963 and still retains the title. 



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